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Welcome to Gemma Arterton Online, your best and oldest source for the english rose Gemma Arterton. We strive to provide you with news, photos, in-depth information, media, fun stuff and much more on our favorite British star! Gemma is most known for her roles in: St. Trinian's, Quantum of Solace, Prince of Persia, Clash of the Titans and Gemma Bovery. Her upcoming films are Their Finest Hour and a Half and The Girl with All the Gifts. She will soon star in a new play Saint Joan, based on the life of Joan of Arc. If you have any questions, concerns or comments, then do not hesitate to get in touch with us. We hope you enjoy the site and come back often!
Archive for the ‘Press’ Category
Nicole   /   February 18, 2017   /   0 Comments

Gemma is featured in the Spring 2017 issue of Town & Country Magazine UK with a beautiful brand new photoshoot! The issue is going to be on sale from February 23rd, and we’ll try to get our hands on it. In the meantime, enjoy the beautiful previews of the editorial and a piece of her interview for the magazine!

TOWN & COUNTRY UK – In an exclusive interview for the magazine, Arterton talks about her varied career path, which has seen her portray iconic women ranging from the Maid of Orleans in the Donmar Warehouse’s production of Saint Joan to a Bond girl in the Hollywood blockbuster Quantum of Solace. Explaining what motivates her to accept a role, she says: “If I read a script, I won’t have an agenda: if I like it, I’m behind it. But usually that means it’s based around something I care about that resonates with me, so probably it is a feminist standpoint with interesting roles for women.”

She continues: “One of the joys in my life is that in the space of a few months I can go from playing a depressed mother to a Restoration strumpet to a wartime screenwriter […] I live these different lives, asking myself, ‘Can I go to that length? Can I push myself further?’ It’s a way of exploring myself. You’re always learning with each role.”

Arterton also addresses the issue of class and race barriers within theatre, commenting: “In theatre we’ve got people from the poshest you can get, down to me. There’s a real mixture. We should just get over the whole class and race thing, and cast people who are right for the part. Am I just going to complain about it, or am I going to create work that allows me to cast the people I want to? It’s all about control.” (source)

GALLERY LINKS:
– Magazine Scans > Scans from 2017 > Town & Country (Spring 2017)
– Photoshoots & Portraits > Town & Country Magazine (2017)
Nicole   /   October 28, 2016   /   0 Comments

BELFAST TELEGRAPH – The British actress, who has made it on to countless most beautiful women lists, has had a varied career; treading the boards on stage as well as starring in both Hollywood and indie flicks.

Earlier this year (16), Gemma won praise after playing the lead role in play Nell Gwynn, and was nominated for a prestigious Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actress. Comparing the stage to the screen, the 30-year-old says the importance placed on looks varies enormously in the two mediums.

“Look, I trained for six years, I started out in the theatre where, if you’re good for the role, you get the part,” she began to Hello! magazine. “I don’t think I ever heard of anyone being hired because of their looks, which is very different from the movie industry. Some producers and directors care, some don’t. And I now choose to work with those who don’t. Frankly, I don’t give a s**t how I look. I don’t want my face or body considered in that way. I’m not a model, that’s not my job, so why would it ever be a consideration?”

As is normal with Gemma’s career, the brunette star has now flipped her attention back to film and television work. She has three new films due for imminent release, plus a further two in production and is also filming a TV version of Watership Down.

While she’s made it clear in the past that she didn’t enjoy her experience on huge blockbuster flicks, Gemma did like the adrenaline kick she got from doing her own stunts on movies like Bond film Quantum of Solace.

“I really loved doing stunts and getting the chance to do them at the beginning of my career was amazing because I loved gymnastics in school. I loved chucking myself around,” she grinned. (source)

M.   /   February 08, 2016   /   0 Comments

By Sheryl Garratt

It’s easy to like Gemma Arterton. She’s smart, funny and rarely afraid to speak her mind, so when she says she’s excited about her latest role, you know she means it. ‘I couldn’t resist it. It’s what we need in the West End right now: a bit of pep, a bit of witty comedy.’

It’s a freezing Monday morning at a rehearsal space in south-east London, and Gemma’s caught an early Eurostar from Paris – where she now lives much of the time – to start her second week of preparation for the West End run of Jessica Swale’s play Nell Gwynn.

Dressed in a grey mohair jumper, dark knee-length skirt, thick tights and suede boots – and with skin that glows despite little sign of make-up – she looks better than ever, with an added touch of Parisian polish. She approves of French style: ‘They know what suits them and they stick to it. It’s about knowing yourself, rather than following trends.’

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M.   /   February 08, 2016   /   0 Comments

Gemma Arterton is about to play feisty royal mistress Nell Gwynn in the West End — and a birthday today is not the only thing they have in common, she tells Nick Curtis

“She’s great fun, witty and fresh and real: she sort of represents this new wave of feminism without being stampy and shouty. She says it how it is.”

Gemma Arterton is describing Nell Gwynn, who she is playing in the West End transfer of Jessica Swale’s play about the orange-seller who became Charles II’s lover, stepping into the dainty shoes originally filled by Gugu Mbatha-Raw at Shakespeare’s Globe. Of course, the description pretty neatly fits Arterton herself, who also shares both an earthy sexuality with Swale’s seductive heroine and a birthday: Arterton turns 30 today while Gwynn would be 366.

The actress grumbles good-humouredly that she’ll mark her milestone with the technical rehearsal for the play after three short weeks’ rehearsal, and won’t be able to celebrate with her family in Gravesend or her boyfriend, assistant director Franklin Ohanessian, in Paris until after the run.

She had even been planning a bit of downtime after a hectic 2015. First she did her first all-singing, all-dancing role in Made in Dagenham, which won her an Evening Standard Theatre Award last year for Newcomer in a Musical, but which sadly closed after six months. (Arterton is still “the most proud of that out of everything I have done” and mourns its passing). Then she made four films back-to-back. But when she read Swale’s script it was a “no brainer”. The part of Nell, like the woman herself, was “irresistible”.

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Nicole   /   March 16, 2015   /   0 Comments

THE GUARDIAN – Born in Kent, Arterton, 29, graduated from Rada. Her movies include St Trinian’s, Quantum Of Solace, Tamara Drewe and Song For Marion. On TV, she played the title role in Tess Of The d’Urbervilles, and her stage work includes The Duchess Of Malfi and, currently, Made In Dagenham. Her new film, The Voices, opens on 20 March. She is divorced and lives in London.

When were you happiest?
In Corsica, climbing mountains and finding waterfalls.

What is your greatest fear?
That any harm should come to my loved ones.

What is your earliest memory?
Buying a Ribena with Dad from a vending machine in a hospital, while waiting for my sister to be born.

What is the trait you most deplore in yourself?
Self-criticism.

What is the trait you most deplore in others?
Ignorance.

Property aside, what’s the most expensive thing you’ve bought?
I have a Terry O’Neill print of Faye Dunaway. That was pretty steep.

What is your most treasured possession?
Home videos of my sister and me as children.

What makes you unhappy?
Boredom.

What do you most dislike about your appearance?
My ears.

Who would play you in the film of your life?
Emma Stone, if she can pull off a Kent accent.

What is your most unappealing habit?
Picking my nails.

What is your favourite smell?
Jasmine.

What did you want to be when you were growing up?
A teacher, then an archaeologist, then a painter, then an actor.

What is top of your bucket list?
To see the northern lights.

What do you owe your parents?
Teaching me, subconsciously, to graft.

What does love feel like?
A hot current running through you. Other times, like constant warmth. Other times, suffocating.

What was the best kiss of your life?
In the rose garden in Regent’s Park.

Have you ever said ‘I love you’ and not meant it?
I have to say it every night on stage at the moment. I like the actor I say it to, but I wouldn’t say that I love him!

Who would you invite to your dream dinner party?
Elizabeth Taylor, Guy Pearce (he’s hilarious), David Bowie, Marjane Satrapi, Gena Rowlands.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
You know what I mean. Sort of.

If you could edit your past, what would you change?
Some choices I made in my early career. Also, I would have continued to practise the guitar.

If you could go back in time, where would you go?
Paris and London in the 1960s.

How do you relax?
Running, swimming and baking.

What is the closest you’ve come to death?
There was a week at school when I accidentally stepped out in front of a bus twice.

What song would you like played at your funeral?
Cloudbusting, by Kate Bush.

Where would you most like to be right now?
In a quiet forest, next to the sea.

(source)